Spring Is Coming, Which Means Summer is Too!

February 20th, 2017 by Terra | Filed under Writing and Reading.

It was a quiet winter for me, but things are beginning to bloom here in Atlanta, including summer camps I’m doing for tweens, teens, AND adults!

 

Two Summer Camps with Decatur Writers Studio

Two sessions only, 12 students each

Camp fee: $400

Register:  www.decaturwritersstudio.com

Email info@decaturwritersstudio.com for more information.

Tweens Who Write

Rising 6th-8th graders

9 a.m.-4 p.m., June 26-30

Agnes Scott College

This is an all-day summer camp for middle schoolers who love to write (or think they might love to write), and want to throw themselves at words and stories. Campers will learn the basic building blocks of story writing, play with story starting ideas, develop characters, explore setting, build their descriptive muscles, and even dabble in some poetry. Whether you have written tons already, or just have a tiny idea, as long as you are willing to experiment, explore, and share, you are the right camper for this!

 

Creative Writing for Teens

Rising 9th-11th graders

9 a.m.-4 p.m., July 10-14

Agnes Scott College

Do you have ideas for stories but not the time to work on them? Or ones you’re excited about at first, but can’t keep up the momentum? Want to develop your characters more fully, work on setting and dialogue, strengthen your powers of description and plotting, get feedback on your work, be inspired by other writers like yourself, and in general immerse yourself in a whole week of nothing but writing? Then this summer camp is for you! This camp will be five days of fiction-centric work, though we will touch on elements of poetry to infuse your prose with dynamic language. Open to experienced teen writers and first-timers alike!

 

Yes, I’m doing Yale Again!

Fiction Writing: Devil in the Details
In her book, Bird by Bird, Ann Lamott stresses the importance of keeping your writing “vivid and continuous” to move the reader smoothly through your story. This clarity and specificity is arguably more important than plot, since, as Eudora Welty once pointed out: “There are two types of stories in the world: someone comes to town, and someone leaves town.” Your challenge as a writer is to keep those stories fresh and memorable, regardless of the genre. This five-day workshop will have in-class lectures and exercises that concentrate on specificity of character, setting, language, and story arc, and the time spent workshopping your pieces will be led with an eye toward keeping it vibrant and distinct. http://summer.yale.edu/academics/yale-writers-conference


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